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~ Enid Collins ~

To many American women and girls from the 1950s through the early 1970s, the Enid Collins bag was a "must have" fashion accessory.  These bags were fun fashion, and were the perfect handbag for a casual ensemble.  And the very features that made the bags so popular then, look just right with today's eclectic approach to dressing.

1960s "Love" Box Bag

"Port of Call" bag, courtesy of Maggie Wilds

Enid Collins was a Texas rancher's wife, and she started making canvas and leather bags in the late 1940s in order to help her family make ends meet. At first her bags were sold in the gift shops of nearby dude ranches, but when Neiman Marcus placed an order, the Collins family found themselves in the handbag business.

Enid and her husband Frederic opened a factory in their town of Medina, Texas to produce their canvas totes. By 1958, they had 80 employees and had opened a retail outlet in Medina.  They also started a plant to construct the wooden boxes for their latest product, the box bag.  In 1966 another factory was opened in Puerto Rico. It was here that the papier mache decorated bags were made. This operation was closed in 1968.

"Pax" or Peace Box Bag

Mariposas Linen Bag

In 1970, Enid Collins sold her business with the copyrights to her designs to the Tandy Corporation.  She continued worked for Tandy for about a year before leaving the company.  Tandy continued to make Enid Collins designs through the early 1970s.  They eventually sold the company.  Enid Collins died in 1990.

Hints for Identifying and Dating Collins Bags

Because the Enid Collins bags were so popular, there were many imitators. Bags produced during the time Enid and her family owned the company are marked ec on the outside of the bag. You will also find the name of the bag printed on the outside. The interior is usually marked "Enid Collins Original" and "Collins of Texas", and often there is the galloping horse logo.

Outside ec signature on 1960s bag

Inside signature on 1960s box bag

From a 1960s box bag

From a 1960s bag

There are other ways that the bags were sometimes marked. There was a sun logo, and sometimes, the bags were marked on the bottom of the outside, instead of the inside.

Boxes were sometimes dated, and if you are really lucky, you'll find one that has a handwritten signature by Ms. Collins, as she did frequent promotional signings. In order for your bag to be from the 1950s or 1960s, you should find Enid Collins's name or initials, or both, somewhere printed on the bag.

Bags that were made after the Collinses sold the business in 1970 have the design name on the exterior. The Collins name and horse logo will be found either on the exterior or on the inside, but Enid's name will not be on the bag.

Interior of a 1970s box bag

1970s Flutterbye Box. Notice, there is no ec signature.

There are many different bag designs, and often several variations on the theme. Popular designs such as the Glitterbugs and Flutterbye were updated and changed with the different seasons. Popular trends affected the designs, such as the mid 1960s Love bags, and various Flower Power themed bags which were made to appeal to younger buyers. Today, some of the most popular designs are the ones based on animals, such as Sophistikit and Wise Guy.

 

Collectibles: Flea Market Finds, Fall 1998.  Enid Collins Handbags, by Jennie Litt.

Young, Susan, Enid Collins Handbag Gallery, CD, 2003.

 

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